Kyphoplasty

Who would benefit from this procedure?

Individuals with spinal compression fractures that may result secondary to trauma, injury or osteoporosis.

How does this procedure work?

This procedure Augments the compression fracture with cement.  The improved height of the vertebral body normalizes the alignment of the spine thus in in turn results in pain relief.

How and Where is this procedure done?

This is done in our office with x-ray guidance.  The patient will be asked to lie on his/her abdomen. The patient is prepped draped in proper surgical sterile manner.  With x-ray guidance the fractured vertebra is identified.

Steps of the procedure:

After preparing the skin, t8 byhe skin is than anesthetized with lidocaine.

A small nick is made with surgical knife.

Bone needle is than directed to its target with X-ray Guidance.

A conduit is made in the fractured room for cement placement.

Cement is injected

Bone needle is removed.

What are the potential risks?

Although this is a very safe procedure, it is not without risk.  Whenever a needle is used there is always the risk of infection and bleeding.  Although rare, there is also risk for spinal cord or nerve root injury as a result of the procedure process or cement.

What should I expect after the procedure?

It is normal to experience temporary soreness at the need placement sites. There may be some temporary discomfort at the bone needle insertion site.  You may also experience temporary bone as results of the augmentation that may last about 7 days.  However, after this time period you should experience pain relief.

Side view of thoracic vertebrae showing a compression fracture of vertebral body and needle inserted releasing cement during vertebroplasty procedure (step 3 of 3)  SOURCE: 7D11843
Referenced from: KDAL #1B9131
12A11801
Also used as:
5a11362_Orphan1-Kdal0320
Instrumentation referenced from Kyphon Brochure: 2007